Blog / Shawn Borton

The Covid Chronicles: April 30

April 30, 2020

April 30

  • Dallas County: 3,531 total cases, 179 new cases, and 5 deaths.
  • Gas update: Price is $1.25/gallon

This is the worst day so far for new cases, but there’s a good reason:

At least part of today’s record number of #Covid19 cases in #Dallas County attributed to change that allows grocery workers to get tested even if they don’t have symptoms

Jason Wheeler (@jasonwheelertv) April 30, 2020

50 died across Texas today — the state’s deadliest day.


Yay!

The Nasdaq Composite is on the cusp of recouping all of its losses for the year as investors bet technology stocks will lead the way to recovery https://www.wsj.com/articles/surging-tech-stocks-nearly-push-nasdaq-out-of-the-red-11588248000?mod=e2tw pic.twitter.com/XS1mVx4Yw4

The Wall Street Journal (@WSJ) April 30, 2020


Boo!

Breaking: More than 3.8 million Americans filed for jobless benefits last week as states struggle to keep up with a surge in coronavirus-triggered claims https://www.wsj.com/articles/states-struggle-with-coronavirus-unemployment-claims-surge-11588239004?mod=e2tw

The Wall Street Journal (@WSJ) April 30, 2020


I’ve been a fan of Martin Gurri’s work since he released The Revolt of the Public. He’s still hard at work and wrote this essay yesterday.

The coming reset will provide an opportunity to “reboot the American dream.” For Andreessen, the time has come to build. That is his theme and his challenge to both poles of the political spectrum. The right should support a private sector that invests aggressively “in new products, in new industries, in new factories, in new science.” The left should expect the public sector to “build better hospitals, better schools, better transportation, better cities, better housing.”

You can find more of his writing at the fifth wave. And be sure to grab the 2nd Edition of The Revolt of the Public on Amazon.


That segues nicely into this bit o’ madness:

At the Michigan capitol building today in Lansing. Photos by Jeff Kowalsky (AFP via Getty) pic.twitter.com/Zf1QdypnNr

Dan Zak (@MrDanZak) April 30, 2020


It feels like Texas is holding its breath. The stay-at-home order expires tomorrow and businesses are nervous to embrace the opportunity to open their doors.

Drive-in theaters are ready, though.

Coyote Drive-In in Fort Worth will be reopening on May 1, and Galaxy Drive-In, near Ennis, has stayed open for most of the coronavirus pandemic.

This weekend, Coyote Drive-In will feature showings of the first “The Fast and the Furious” movie, “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” “Trolls: World Tour” and “Sonic the Hedgehog.”

Galaxy is also showing “Trolls,” as well as “Fantasy Island,” “Bloodshot,” “The Invisible Man,” “The Hunt” and “Underwater.”

A mix of old and new. But why? (Emphasis added)

But most movie theaters make money off of new movies, not repertory screenings, and a new wide-release film hasn’t hit theaters since March 13.

Wow, has it been that long?


No matter what the future holds, we’ll keep reaching for the stars.

NASA has chosen Elon Musk’s SpaceX, Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin and Dynetics to develop landers to take astronauts back to the surface of the moon https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/30/science/nasa-moon-lander.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur

The New York Times (@nytimes) April 30, 2020


Written by Shawn Borton who builds and writes and builds and writes... Socials: TwitterInstagram